Man fart cashing in on nft

NFT marketplace OpenSea.

The project started last year during quarantine, with no aim to tokenize it until the group saw the ridiculous prices that were being thrown around for NFTs online. The main man behind the farts, Alex Ramírez-Mallis, told the New York Post, ““The NFT craze is absurd — this idea of putting a value on something inherently intangible.”

Ramírez-Mallis’ ability to make a profit from breaking wind might actually be possible on OpenSea, as they don’t take gas fees upfront to mint tokens.

“I’m hoping these NFT farts can at once critique [the absurdity], make people laugh and make me rich,” he said.

Artist will burn Star Wars and Marvel NFTs for you, literally

Mogul Productions, a decentralized film financing platform will release a series of NFTs in collaboration with Marvel and D.C comic book artist Rob Prior.


GIFs, why not sell farts?” Alex Ramírez-Mallis, 36, told The Post of his dank addition to the blockchain-based NFT market.

His NFT, “One Calendar Year of Recorded Farts,” began incubating in March 2020 when, at the beginning of the global coronavirus lockdown, Ramírez-Mallis and four of his friends began sharing recordings of their farts to a group chat on WhatsApp.

On the one-year anniversary of the US’s COVID-19 quarantine this month — by which point Ramírez-Mallis said he could darn near identify members of the group by their farts alone — Ramírez-Mallis and his fellow farters compiled the recordings into a 52-minute “Master Collection” audio file.

Now, the top bid for the file is currently $183.

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Individual fart recordings are also available for 0.05 Ethereum, or about $85 a pop.

Man fart cashing in on nft

The gassy group has so far sold one, to an anonymous buyer.

“If the value increases, they could have an extremely valuable fart on their hands,” he said.

Ramírez-Mallis and his friends did not begin recording their farts with profit in mind, but the recent NFT madness — which has seen the ownership of abstract assets be sold for seven– and eight-digit price tags — provided the “perfect outlet to share” their large back catalog of farts.

The ridiculousness of it all is not lost on the Flatbush resident.

“The NFT craze is absurd — this idea of putting a value on something inherently intangible,” said Ramírez-Mallis, referencing screenshots of screenshots and the concept of colors which are currently being sold as NFTs.

NFT project — they have a fantastic user experience, but the important thing there is like I have a relationship with something that means something to me that nobody else has.”

Schwartz also sees the potential for NFTs to reform digital rights and ownership, and notes that consumers on platforms such as Hulu, Netflix and Apple don’t own any songs or movies, which leaves them victim to subscription pricing fluctuations and losing their content if the platforms go out of business.

NFL Star Patrick Mahomes NFT is going for more than $80,000

NFL star Patrick Mahomes of the Kansas City Chiefs has followed Rob Gronkowski, with an NFT auction on MakersPlace that is due to close on March 20.

The NFT drop “Museum of Mahomes’ ‘ depicts the greatest sporting moments from the player’s career, such as GIFs of Most Valuable Player trophies and in-game action shot illustrations.

His NFT, “One Calendar Year of Recorded Farts,” began incubating in March 2020 when, at the beginning of the global coronavirus lockdown, Ramírez-Mallis and four of his friends began sharing recordings of their farts to a group chat on WhatsApp. On the one-year anniversary of the US’s COVID-19 quarantine this month — by which point Ramírez-Mallis said he could darn near identify members of the group by their farts alone — Ramírez-Mallis and his fellow farters compiled the recordings into a 52-minute “Master Collection” audio file.

Now, the top bid for the file is currently $183. Individual fart recordings are also available for 0.05 Ethereum, or about $85 a pop. The gassy group has so far sold one, to an anonymous buyer.

“If the value increases, they could have an extremely valuable fart on their hands,” he said.

The trendiness of NFTs has made the concept of selling the idea of ownership somehow palatable and profitable to the very-online masses, he went on. Indeed, he’s not even the only person selling fart NFTs.

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While aware that the concept has manifested into madness, Ramírez-Mallis still hopes to profit off it.

“I’m hoping these NFT farts can at once critique [the absurdity], make people laugh and make me rich,” he said.

But, he admits, there is some historical precedent for the concept of NFTs.

“In many ways, this is a bubble, but it’s also been around forever,” he said, comparing NFTs to wealthy art collectors buying expensive works, putting them in storage and only displaying their certificate of ownership, then selling that for more money.

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Brian Quarmby 21 minutes ago Nifty News: Tony Hawk’s ‘final’ ollie, man auctions farts, Star Wars and Marvel NFTs

Tony Hawk auctions tokenized ollie, NY man sells NFT farts (with low ‘gas fees’), Star Wars and Marvel NFTs to be burned by the artist and Ripple wants to cash in on the NFT craze.

1135Total views7Total sharesListen to article 0:00 News

Retired pro skateboarding icon Tony Hawk is the latest celebrity riding the NFT boom, announcing the imminent release of a tokenized video depicting his final ever 540-degree ollie via Ethernity Chain. This will be the last time fans will be able to see Hawk perform the trick, after landing his first one 32 years ago in 1989.

Now 52, Hawk became one of the world’s top skateboarders at 16 years old and is renowned for completing the first ever 900-degree spin at the 1999 X-Games.

The trendiness of NFTs has made the concept of selling the idea of ownership somehow palatable and profitable to the very-online masses, he went on. Indeed, he’s not even the only person selling fart NFTs.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

While aware that the concept has manifested into madness, Ramírez-Mallis still hopes to profit off it.

“I’m hoping these NFT farts can at once critique [the absurdity], make people laugh and make me rich,” he said.

But, he admits, there is some historical precedent for the concept of NFTs.

“In many ways, this is a bubble, but it’s also been around forever,” he said, comparing NFTs to wealthy art collectors buying expensive works, putting them in storage and only displaying their certificate of ownership, then selling that for more money.

The first drop will include three pieces inspired by Star Wars, Marvel and Wolf of Wall Street, which will be auctioned off on the Mogul platform in late spring.

As part of the NFT auction, buyers have the option of receiving the original artwork or watching it get set on fire by the artist via video. NFT depicting an incarcerated painting from UK street artist Banksy fetched nearly $400,000 through auction.

Ripple looking for ways to incorporate NFT’s in XRP ledger

Ripple CTO David Schwartz has stated he is looking at potential ways to incorporate non-fungible tokens into the XRP ledger.

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